Thousands of fuel strike supporters are planning on boycotting two of Australia’s biggest petrol stations in protest of the highest fuel prices in a decade.

Angered motorists are planning to target ‘the major companies’ after prices have skyrocketed due to ‘gouging’ retailers Australia-wide.

164,000 people across the country pledged on social media their plans to boycott petrol stations on Friday October 26.

Thousands of fuel strike supporters are planning on boycotting two of Australia’s biggest petrol stations in protest of the highest fuel prices in a decade

Australian unleaded petrol prices have reached the highest point in a decade (pictured)

But some say it isn’t enough, as the National Fuel Strike said on their Facebook page: ‘After doing sufficient research I have found that not filling up for two days will barely do any damage’.

‘If we as Australians really want to do some damage, then we must start thinking outside the box, as not filling up fuel for 2 days then filling up your whole tank on Monday will barely make any difference,’ the Facebook post read.

Retired music teacher Sabrina Lamont is the owner of the page, as she had to give up a job she loved when she could no longer afford to buy fuel to drive 500km a week to teach isolated children.

The fed-up motorist from Bundaberg in Queensland decided she wasn’t going to put up with costly pump prices and created the Facebook page.

She has now proposed to boycott BP and Shell petrol stations for the rest of 2018, as they are ‘continuously driving prices up’.

Fuel Strike supporters are now proposing to boycott BP and Shell petrol stations for the rest of 2018, as they are ‘continuously driving prices up’

164,000 people across the country pledged on social media their plans to boycott petrol stations on Friday October 26

‘By boycotting these 2 stations until they drop the prices to an affordable price we will get a better outcome,’ she wrote.

Petrol prices in some parts of the country are at a ten-year high due to a weaker Australian dollar and higher global oil prices.

Australia sources its crude oil from Singapore.

With the national average for unleaded pushing towards $1.60 a litre and some suburbs already forking out more than $1.70 a litre, experts say they’re noticing Australians getting fed up.

Hundreds of Australians have supported Ms Lamont’s will to boycott the two companies, after 164,000 people pledged to halt their petrol use for one day.

A spokesperson from BP told Daily Mail Australia their aim is to ‘always be competitive with our fuel pricing and attract customers to our sites’.

‘We value our customers’ patronage and know they have a choice,’ they said.

‘At the same time BP also offers an extensive nationwide network that provides great product offers, services and facilities.’

Retired music teacher Sabrina Lamont decided she wasn’t going to put up with costly pump prices any more when she created the Facebook page ‘National fuel strike’ (pictured)

NRMA spokesperson Peter Khoury said it’s understandable that consumers are frustrated, but believes the one-day boycott isn’t a long-term solution.

‘The factors that affect the price of petrol aren’t going to go away tomorrow,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

‘The inflation factors have been around all of 2018 and they’re not going to change in one day.’

Senior Economist at CommSec Ryan Felsman shares the sentiment, saying the best long-term solution is for consumers to hold ‘gouging’ petrol stations accountable.

‘Customers can plan their top-ups better,’ he said.

‘The best way to deal with the gouging stations is to boycott those stations.’

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Shell for comment.

Extracted from Daily Mail