Genesis – the luxury arm of South Korean car-maker Hyundai – has reportedly stopped developing wireless electric-car charging systems, following low demand for the technology in its home market.

South Korean car-maker Genesis – the luxury off-shoot of Hyundai – has ended its development of wireless electric-car chargers due to low demand and interest from customers.

As reported by South Korean website BloterGenesis has started to close its wireless electric-car charging business, which operated chargers at two of the car maker’s showrooms in Seoul – as well as one Hyundai showroom.

The publication reports the chargers began operating in February 2022, though low interest in the technology and technical oversights has led to its closure.

South Korean car-maker Genesis – the luxury off-shoot of Hyundai – has ended its development of wireless electric-car chargers due to low demand and interest from customers.

As reported by South Korean website BloterGenesis has started to close its wireless electric-car charging business, which operated chargers at two of the car maker’s showrooms in Seoul – as well as one Hyundai showroom.

The publication reports the chargers began operating in February 2022, though low interest in the technology and technical oversights has led to its closure.

The Genesis wireless charging pad

In August 2021, Green Car Reports said the Genesis GV60 would become the first current electric car to add support for wireless battery charging technology through an optional transmitter to receive the energy – with the Genesis Electrified G80 sedan later adopting the technology.

However, South Korean media report examples of the Genesis GV60 equipped with the wireless charging transmitter had a claimed driving range almost 20km shorter than those without the technology.

The publication also reports the wireless chargers proved unreliable, and were only capable of charging at up to 11kW – similar to an AC ‘wallbox’ charger in a home or office garage, and requiring more than seven hours to provide a full charge.

Despite being underpinned by the same E-GMP platform as the Genesis GV60, it is understood the wireless charging technology was not available for Hyundai’s Ioniq 5 and 6 electric cars, nor the Kia EV6.

According to Bloter, Genesis will now focus on “developing premium electric vehicle charging services” that use a plug.

Genesis wasn’t alone in developing wireless vehicle battery charging, and its technology rolled out almost four years after BMW became the first manufacturer to offer factory-backed wireless charging – developing an inductive charging pad for the hybrid 530e.

Earlier this year, US electric-car giant Tesla reportedly purchased a wireless charging specialist – Wiferion, subsequently renamed Tesla Engineering Germany GmbH – for $US76 million ($AU115.6 million).

Extracted in full from: Genesis ends wireless electric-car charging development – report – Drive

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